Sunday, February 15, 2015

The many small steps to Pincha Mayurasana (पिंच मयूरासन ) (Feathered Peacock Pose)

Pincha Mayurasana (or Feathered Peacock Pose) is a yoga pose that roughly translates to a forearm stand. This can be the next step after mastering (or getting decent at) the Headstand (Shirshasana).

You'll need some tools to be able to start practicing the feathered peacock pose. There are:

  1. Forearm strength
  2. Shoulder strength
  3. Lower Back strength
  4. Lower Back flexibility (to arch into a slight concavity)
  5. General balance (that you'll have developed as part of the headstand practice)
  6. Some Core strength (that you'll have developed as part of the headstand practice)

Here are some posts explaining (in great detail) how to attain the final pose and possibly some of the intermediate steps needed to be practiced on the way to getting there:
  1. Baby Steps to Forearm Stands
  2. Pincha Mayurasana (Two Fit Moms)
  3. Feathered Peacock Pose (Yoga Journal) and the video
  4. Benefits of Pincha Mayurasana
Here are some excellent videos that you should watch to get a visual introduction to the pose:






Let me now discuss some of the extra bits I would like to add or stuff I would like to emphasize from the posts and videos above:


  1. Practicing the Cobra Pose (Bhujangasana) was helpful in opening up my lower back
  2. Practicing the Locust Pose (Salabhasana) (or even doing one leg at a time) was extremely helpful in developing lower back strength
  3. Forearm and shoulder strength can be developed by practicing the Peacock Pose (Mayursana) and by using wrist strengtheners such as a Powerball
  4. When I started, I used a wall to support me when I kicked up from the dolphin pose
  5. Forearm strength, shoulder strength, and general flexibility can be developed by practising multiple rounds of Surya Namaskaar
  6. Andrei Ram Om's video on the Feathered Peacock pose (above) touches up on some subtle but important aspects about the back position (arched) and the differences between various hand positions. I think it's extremely relevant to know these differences when you start so that you can experience the full flavour of the pose

On Shanti, and keep practising! Namastey!


2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Typo in the penultimate line of the post makes for a great twist (Freudian slip?) :P

Dhruv Matani said...

haha! I didn't notice that - super observation.

I'll leave it that way cause it's better :-p